The Good Life Festival, Hawarden Flintshire Rides

Hawarden

"Surrounded by Beauty and Peace"


Overview of Hawarden

Hawarden is the graceful village known for its extensive history and famed former residents. Located in the beautiful county of Flintshire in North Wales, this small village is bursting at the seams with life and culture.

 

Hawarden is home to two out of seven well-known castles in Flintshire; both possessing their own past lives that have helped shape and mould Hawarden, making it the colourful town it is today.

 

The first castle to be built on Hawarden’s remarkable grounds was the medieval timber Motte and Bailey donjon dating back to the Iron Age. This fortress, like many of its kind, including Mold’s Motte and Bailey Castle, was destroyed during the 13th century, later being rebuilt as a stronger, more reliant construct. (Hawarden Old Castle)

 

Although currently little remains of Hawarden’s once great castle, the surviving ruins provide residents and tourists alike with a constant reminder of the tyranny and devastation that befell Hawarden centuries ago.

 

The second Castle located within the borough is the 18th century estate built in 1752. This grand structure was initially a house built for Sir John Glynne but over the years and through inheritance, the Glynne home changed hands, each time becoming more and more impressive through extensions and remodelling. Eventually, Hawarden’s new castle fell into the hands of former Victorian prime minister, William Ewart Gladstone, also known as W E Gladstone, who helped popularise the build and its surrounding land. Gladstone and his wife, Catherine Gladstone, previously Catherine Glynne, once again made alterations to the mansion, turning it into the neo-gothic configuration you see today.

Six facts about Hawarden

  1. Hawarden appears in the Doomsday Book under its previous given name, Haordine. In addition to this, Hawarden has also previously been referred to as Weordin, Pen-y-Llwch and Hauwerthyn.
  2. Hawarden is one of the many ancient parishes of Flintshire.
  3. One man who helped popularise Hawarden was the Victorian British Prime Minister William Ewart Gladstone (W E Gladstone) who served for four terms spread over 12 years from 1868 to 1894. Gladstone lived in Hawarden's 'New' castle for over 60 years.
  4. When founding Gladstone's library, W E Gladstone's wish, according to his daughter, Mary Gladstone, was to, "bring together books who had no readers with readers who had no books."
  5. Hawarden Secondary School was not only attended by the international professional footballer, Michael Owen but also the former manager of the Wales national football team, Gary Speed.
  6. Hawarden's 'New' 18th century Castle links back to Broadlane Hall, a house made out of wood and plaster which was demolished in the 1750's.

Images from Hawarden

Find out more about Hawarden

 

The new Hawarden Castle has multiple open days a year allowing visitors from far and wide to explore and ponder the grounds, soaking in the beautiful surrounding wildlife, nature and prehistoric builds providing you and your loved ones with a perfect action-packed day out. Furthermore, the bustling locale also hosts a quirky festival suited to all ages! To learn more about this intriguing estate and their lively Good Life Experience Festival, visit the official Good Life Experience website.

In addition to Hawarden’s well known castles, W E Gladstone also founded the village’s ever popular residential library in 1894. This library was named after Gladstone, making it Gladstone’s Library  and it is also here that you will find the Flintshire Archives office.

The magnificent assembly of printed works, books and pamphlets were all a part of Gladstone’s personal collection, which he wanted to share with the residents of Hawarden, especially those who could not afford to buy books themselves.

Today this impressive noble library is open to the public with a welcoming bistro restaurant called Food For Thought to reflect the humble chapel designed for prayer and mindfulness. In addition, further facilities are available to book for conferences and meetings.

 

Hawarden as a village offers an oasis of tranquillity, as well as the perfect location for all golf enthusiasts. With a vibrant 18-hole golf course and dedicated club, you can undergo golfing lessons, shop to your heart’s content at the club’s pro shop and impress your loved ones by showing off on the stunning golf course.

 

Located in and around Hawarden are multiple adventurous walking paths and trails with sweeping views overlooking the Cheshire plain. These easy access tracks provide you with captivating views, plenty of fresh air and a sense of freedom that can be hard to find.

 

To complete your trip to Hawarden, splash the cash and dine like royalty at one of the village’s many local pubs, shops, cafes, restaurants and bars, including but not limited to, the wonderful Farm Shop, The Glynne Arms and the Gallery Coffee Shop.

 

To conclude, Hawarden is a village full of character and charm with stories to learn and tales to tell. The happy, uplifting spirit that lingers throughout the town is infectious and only amplified by the numerous facilities and attractions on offer throughout the year.

More Places of Interest

Mold Castle

Bailey Hill Front Entrance Gate Mold Flintshire

Bailey Hill, now known as Mold Castle, is a monumental site located in the town of Mold, Flintshire. With an interesting history, this Park is under reconstruction to embrace its past and make it more accessible to visitors. With stunning views, nature and winding paths, it’s a great distraction after a shopping trip.

Flint Castle

Flint Castle Walls Flintshire

Flint Castle is a timeless medieval monument based in Flint, Flintshire. Home to intriguing tales of war and conquest, this sand and stone structure is one of historic importance. Although the site was once an outpost of war, it is now a splendid tourist attraction situated on the shores of the beautiful River Dee estuary.

Holywell

Garreg Tower Sunset Holywell Flintshire

Holywell is an interesting small parish located in Flintshire overlooking the Dee estuary. One of Wales’ Seven Wonders can be found at St. Winefride’s Well, making this little town the perfect start for those wanting to spend time surrounded by history, nature and solitude.